personal trainer

Why Aren’t You Using Online Fitness Coaching?

If I were to tell you that you could burn away as much fat as possible by sitting at your computer twiddling your fingers and toes, would you believe me? Well I sure hope you don’t!

However, losing weight in the confines of your own home at your computer is not only possible, it’s a reality. What I mean is that you can use the advice that’s given to you through online fitness coaching to pursue a more productive way of burning off undesired fat and reach your fitness goals.

Any program, no matter how difficult or time consuming takes EFFORT. Through online coaching, anyone can receive the advice and the motivation to put 100% effort into their fitness goals. The end result whether its weight loss, toning, and muscle gain can be achieved with certainty.

It’s all about saving time and money!

If you can imagine yourself with a personal trainer at the gym, receiving face to face advice, and helping you out physically with your exercise routine. Then by all means sign up to one of your local programs and off you go! There’s nothing wrong with having your own personal trainer.

But the down side is that these expert trainers cost money. Some can charge $150 per hour, and many find this service so expensive to the point where their wallets are paper-thin and overdue bills are pilling up!

The cost each type of personal training (offline – meet your trainer type) varies with different levels of service and convenience, let’s investigate some of these services on offer.

Personal training in a health club:

This has to be the least expensive due to the fact that you’re already paying the club a membership fee. You could be stuck with long cues for equipment let alone the discomforting stares of fellow exercisers.

Working out at home:

With a personal trainer, this can obviously be the most convenient provided you have some equipment at home. You might find yourself walking to the bank more often with the higher rates these “come to your home” types charge.

Private training studio:

If you’ve accepted the invitation for personal training at their studio, chances are you’ll be paying fees that would fit into the “pricey” category. Location is also another factor; if the studio is located further away than you can walk then it may not be convenient for you.

Furthermore, if the personal trainer has a busy schedule, you may not get the appointment times you had hoped for.

Although location and price can be inconvenient, there’s no doubt that this method can be the most effective way to exercise. Sometimes, it’s a case of confidence and personal preference to avoid certain situations, which may leave you embarrassed, confused or bothered.

For example, many have been pushed into taking advantage of the local gym’s personal trainers. In terms of the convenience factor, it’s a plus if you’ve signed up for a lengthy period. But you might find that sweating and stretching in front of hundreds of people just isn’t your thing! Many people just can’t stand that.

Diets and Personal Training are alike!

The truth has to be told here. People who start an exercise routine (with or without a personal trainer), only half will continue this good habit for long-term. The rest will have thrown in the towel within 6 months.

How surprised would you be to find out that old habits are repeated when you stop personal training?

This obviously varies from person to person but the lack of trainer support can sometimes render a person lazy to the point where they neglect their fitness… because for many it’s the external motivation that provides the will to exercise and reach their goals in life.

Online fitness coaching can provide a very similar service to traditional personal training, and the costs involved are usually much lower and much more affordable for the general population.

In many situations, online consultation can be an excellent service if the trainer can deliver the right amount of motivation and supporting advice to the client. This can be seen in the case of weight loss, where many clients find weight loss a difficult task due to lack of confidence.

There are always that bunch of people who will shy away from a personal trainer because of misconceptions and stereotypes. They may fear losing face having to hire one or be under false impression that trainers are just for athletes or bodybuilders.

This is far from the truth – a supporting hand from a trainer can go a long way for many wanting to slim down or improve their fitness levels.

Online coaching really excels when the trainer acts as a mentor and plays a supporting role to dissolve misconceptions and stereotypes about people’s inability to achieve the results they’re after.

Let’s go through some of the benefits that can be attained using online coaching:

* Personal coaching no matter where you or the trainer are located around the globe can help you develop the will and motivation to exercise

* Save money on travel expenses and expensive personal trainers

* You can exercise when you want discarding the need for timed exercise appointments

* Where self-motivation fails, online training can provide enough support to stick with a homemade program.

* No need to workout at a specific place designated by the trainer, take control over your workouts at home, at the gym, at work or on the road

* Sit in the comfort of your own home on your computer to receive coaching and advice

* Have your training questions and problems answered with educated responses, promptly and confidentially via email

* Allows for tremendous flexibility, especially for those who travel.

* Allows privacy for those who are intimidated by “public” personal training, such as people who don’t feel comfortable with their bodies.

* The American Council on Exercise asserts that online training is an effective supplement to working one-on-one with a qualified trainer

As you weigh down the benefits of online personal training, you’ll find that each method will give you substantial results provided that YOU are willing to put 100% effort into your exercise & dietary program.

Personal trainers can’t do all the work for you, but they can guide you in the right direction to the point where you can observe results in weeks not years.

Whatever the interest, the choice comes down to you. Whether you’re comfortable just working out with a friend, willing to spend money to see a personal trainer, or find opportunity with an online trainer, the achievements you make will be proportional to the time you put in.

Benefits of Having a Personal Trainer – The Motivation Factor

If you have never had a personal fitness trainer, it’s probably good to get some idea of what you should expect from personal training – and what to ask any potential trainer, to make sure that you get a qualified trainer who understands your goals. Careful research and asking the right questions will help you avoid having an unpleasant experience that may lead to abandonment of your fitness or weight loss goals.

Finding a good personal fitness trainer takes time and effort on your part. But the research and time you put into finding the right personal trainer could make all the difference in whether or not you get results from your weight loss or fitness program.

A good personal trainer is one who will help you keep your fitness program interesting, so you won’t become bored, only to quit and not stick to your fitness program at all. Your personal trainer should incorporate a variety of different exercise programs and equipment – including the use of dumbbells, barbells, medicine balls, and maybe even kettlebells, ropes or sandbags. And if any of those sound unfamiliar to you, then there’s even more reason to hire a personal trainer to help you and teach you the most effective exercises for losing weight and improving your fitness level.

Once you have decided to hire a personal fitness trainer, he or she should match your requirements. And your expectations should be extremely high. Don’t skimp on the quality of the personal training to save money. Any money is wasted if you don’t get results.

Ask the personal trainers you are considering for a complimentary session or “test drive.” if you are going to invest a lot of money and time into a personal training program, you deserve to know what you are getting before you hand over the money. Any good trainer would be thrilled to introduce you to his/her training style with a free session or two, to familiarize yourself with the facility, his methods, and his qualifications.

Most trainers will offer an hour workout while others just one half hour. Some trainers will offer you workout sessions at your home, or personal training sessions in a professional studio or a gym. Whatever you decide, choose a comfortable environment, where you are confident that you will feel motivated, energized, and are able to be consistent with your fitness program. If it’s a place you don’t like to be, the chances are good that you won’t want to go. And that means that your chance of success is low.

When seeking out personal training, always verify your professional fitness trainer’s credentials. Always. And don’t assume that a certification is enough. A good trainer is more than a smart guy who passed a paper test about anatomy or physiology. He or she is personable, friendly, motivating and encouraging. Many personal trainers have knowledge about fitness but may not be able to teach you what they know or lack communication skills that make it easy for you to not only do what they say, but understand the reasons why.

Most professional personal fitness trainers will have you fill out a medical questionnaire before starting any program of fitness. Be accurate and honest in your answers. Next you may be asked to perform a series of exercises to assess your fitness level. That will determine, for the most part, where your weaknesses and strengths are.

You should have to have your height, weight recorded along with other measurements before you start your program. This is for the personal fitness trainer to keep track of your progress as you begin your fitness training and to make appropriate recommendations as he or she creates your personalized fitness program. The preferred method is bioelectrical impedance, just for the convenience of it, although it only provides an estimate of body fat percentage, and isn’t 100% reliable or accurate. But it’s a good start. If your trainer doesn’t know what bioelectrical impedance is – run for the hills. Calipers is another good way to measure, but will fluctuate based on how / who conducts the caliper test for body fat. Either way – you just need to know where you are when you start so you can measure progress over time.

Some people are wary of getting “before” pictures taken. If you’re uncomfortable having a personal trainer take your photo, then do one at home. Strip down to shorts, or running bra, or even swimsuit for the brave. I highly recommend this. That photo will be of great value to you later. I can’t tell you how many of my personal training clients say the WISH they had listened to me and taken a photo before their amazing transformation. That photo is a LOT less embarrassing months later, when you look great, confident and 20 pounds lighter!

Keeping a record of your diet is essential to a fitness program. We don’t always eat as well as we should. We have Busy lives, eating lots of fast foods can be unhealthy and your personal fitness trainer will let you know, and can suggest better alternatives for your goals of staying fit. Keeping a nutrition journal is crucial. Ask your trainer if they provide clients with a personalized nutrition and exercise journal that they fill out and show to their personal trainer on a regular basis. The act of journaling your food and keeping a diet journal can be a powerful tool for helping your success in getting results from personal training.

Certified personal fitness trainers should be educated in the areas of nutrition, and a proper diet, in addition to exercise, physiology and strength exercise.

They should be willing to create the right diet for you to follow and encourage you to follow your goals.

It’s always important that any personal fitness trainer is certified and carries insurance. But remember that not all certifications are the same. Some personal trainers are ‘certified’ online, or even by their facility. There are no strict regulations in the personal training industry for trainers – so don’t just take a certification as being a qualification. Look for a well recognized national certification with strict requirements, mandatory continuing education, and proof of actual practical experience.

Another advantage of working with a trainer if you are in a gym or health club, is that working with a personal trainer often means no waiting or taking turns on machines or other fitness equipment.

Having a scheduled appointment for your training encourages you to attend your program regularly, and having a set personal training schedule with your trainer will increase your chances of consistency and success with weight loss.

A personal fitness trainer makes your appointments, sets time aside just for you, and keeps track of your progress by assessing your body fat and weight over time.

He/she will know your progress, and know what your endurance is, in order to prevent injuries from pushing yourself too much. Knowing your progress and having it recorded will give you feedback about how you’re doing, and what you need to change.

Having a personal fitness trainer helps, motivates and encourages you to stay with your fitness program, helping with both physical and mental health. And above all – will help you get faster weight loss and fitness results that you can maintain for the rest of your life.

What Is A Personal Trainer

Imagine stepping into the gym for the first time in your life. There are so many machines and gadgets. What do you do first? Is this one safe? Are you using it right? There are so many questions to ask about trying to get physically fit as well. How much should you push yourself? How much is too much?

A personal trainer is someone who steps in and will coach you through your weight loss regime. What is it that a personal trainer does exactly?

Finding Out What A Personal Trainer Does Is Step Number One
Whenever I want to find out what it is that a personal trainer does, I simply visit the website or look at an advertisement of another personal trainer. From personal trainer, I have found the following list to be exactly what a personal trainer does.

Coaching workouts that intensify gradually at different stages
Working to increase improvement function of the body from walking and running, etc.

Keeping a client up to date on nutrition

Practices safe stretching and exercise techniques

Helps to increase muscle tone and metabolism in the body

Minimize the possibility of injury

Increase the client’s self-confidence and put good ‘stress’ to encourage

Eliminate laziness and excuses from stopping the client from getting what they want

What is it that Clients Ask When Looking for a Personal Trainer?
One that I have found says that finding the best personal trainer is to simply ask a lot of questions. If you ask questions of your personal trainer and he or she does not know the answer or doesn’t give an answer you are particularly happy with, a client should simply walk away.

If you are looking to become a personal trainer, expect to hear questions. What is your background? How long have you been doing this? How are you involved in the industry? Do you stay competitive in the industry? What is the education level that you have? Did you get certified in a weekend or are you university educated? Are you continuing to educate yourself on the latest health techniques? Insurance? CPR? First Aid?

If you are able to answer these questions to a client, you’ll be much more likely to sign a client. Above all, personal trainer will make a customer state his or her reasonable goals and set a plan to reach those goal in a healthy and constructive learning environment that will let the client keep the regime for years to come, even if they stop using the personal trainer.

What is it That Separates a Good Personal Trainer from a Bad One?
Like when you shop for anything else, there are good trainers and there are bad personal trainers, but what is the difference?
A good personal trainer would tell you that you should shop around and find the right trainer for you. A lot of corporate gym trainers have sales quotas, do you really think they’re primary interest is your health? Most of them have minimal training and are more of a sales person than a trainer.

If you are looking to become a personal trainer, what is it you should do first? Try to take course on exercise, fitness and health. If you also stay involved personally in the body building industry, you’re also staying on top of the competition. Commitment is the key; you have to be committed, as your clients certainly will not be. They will want to quit and give excuses. You can’t let them.

Above all, a personal trainer really cares about the client. You can’t simply treat them like another paycheck. A customer has personal goals and needs and is asking you to help them along a path they can’t walk on their own. What a personal trainer is, is not a salesman or a drill sergeant, a personal trainer is a coach, a mentor and a partner on a road to a goal.

Does Your Personal Trainer Know Squat?

Is your personal trainer qualified? How experienced are they? How can you know before committing to a long-term agreement? These are all questions that clients looking to hire a personal trainer have or should have.

Personal trainers hold a great deal of responsibility in their hands, as they “direct” their clients how to exercise safely and effectively. Personal training can be a lucrative career too, with some trainers charging as much if not more than doctor or lawyer consultation rates.

It is unlikely that you would hire a lawyer or a doctor strictly on heresy, popularity or if they “looked the role” but rather you would spend a good deal of time researching his or her credentials, track record and education. So why if you’re going to pay a personal trainer equivalent fees should choosing an exercise professional be any different?

Rather than re-hash the details of the typical “How to Choose a Personal Trainer” cliche, this article provides the lay consumer just two helpful pieces of information to help when deciding on how to choose a personal trainer.

Grade the trainer’s qualifications

A personal trainer is an exercise professional so their credentials should demonstrate this. Check to see if the trainer has had a formal education in exercise science, physiology or sports medicine.

Exercise is about science and is grounded firmly in the fields of anatomy, physiology and nutrition. Each field complements and builds on the other. Even the most experienced (or well-built!) personal trainer cannot fake knowledge he does not have. A thorough understanding of these fields is essential to effective and safe exercise instruction and is unlikely to be gained in a weekend or even a multiple week study course.

The client looking to hire a personal trainer should also check the certifying organization. Currently the most respected credentials are offered by the NSCA (National Strength and Conditioning Association), NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine), ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) and ACE (American Council on Exercise).

Some certifying bodies such the NSCA require certain educational requirements to be completed before sitting for the exam. An example is the NSCA’s Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), which requires a bachelors degree in a related field to sit for the exam.

Grade the trainer’s experience

An experienced and well-educated exercise professional can easily recognize others on par with themselves simply by observing the manner in how they work with their client and by watching the client’s exercise technique.

But what about the casual exerciser who knows nothing of exercise or fitness? How can they discern the small details that give clues to a trainer’s experience and quality of instruction? After all, certification only means that the personal trainer passed a written exam.

The answer is that it is very tricky for a layperson to judge personal trainers themselves from simple observation and as a result, may rely too heavily on the opinion of others.

Don’t get me wrong there is nothing more valuable to a personal trainer than a good reputation and “word of mouth”, but an informed consumer looking for a quality exercise professional should do a little more homework.

While there may be dozens of time consuming and complicated ways to assess a personal trainer’s instruction quality and experience, this article describes a single test that will give the client a basic insight before committing to a contract or agreement. A client should not be embarrassed or scared to use this test; it is the full right and privilege of the client to interview and consult with the trainer before committing on a long-term or contractual basis.

The importance of the squat

The squat is a very functional movement that mimics everyday tasks such as lifting and getting out of the seated position. The squat is also quite a complex movement to both learn and teach and must be performed correctly with optimal technique to ensure safety and effectiveness.

Consider the importance of instructing safe technique in the squat. A loaded bar resting on a client’s back places them in a compromising position, opening the door to the possibility of a crippling injury. A personal trainer then needs to be particularly attentive to detail when their client performs such an exercise.

The squat test then is a good means of roughly assessing the trainer’s instructional ability and experience.

How can I use the squat test for grading my personal trainer?

If you can do it before signing with the trainer, try to observe him or her instructing other clients in the performance of a squat. Does the trainer carefully observe the client’s technique (in a mirror if spotting) and offer pointers if necessary or does he or she look around or out the window and seem indifferent? As I mentioned, a squat can be a dangerous exercise to perform, especially for the inexperienced exerciser so attentiveness to detail is essential here.

If you are unable to observe the personal trainer’s technique beforehand, request a free consultation and during this time have him or her instruct you in the performance of a body weight squat (even if you hate squats and never plan on doing them as part of an exercise routine, request that the trainer observe your technique and offer pointers as if it were a barbell loaded squat).

In either situation, if the observed client’s technique demonstrates the following pointers, or if the personal trainer confidently makes mention of most or all of them, it indicates a good working knowledge in how to teach and ensure safety and correct form in the squat.

If the trainer passes the squat test, the experience and skill they demonstrate will most likely transfer to the instruction of other exercises too.

Here are some of the most important pointers for safe and effective performance of the back squat:

· The bar rests on a platform base of the lower neck and shoulders

· The feet shoulder/hip width apart and very slightly toed out; the heels should only be placed on blocks if the instructor observes the heels rising off the floor in the decent (tight calf muscles)

· The lifter inhales before the descent and holds his/her breath (kudos if the instructor mentions avoiding the “Valsalva Maneuver”* here)

· The legs “buckle” under control – like “sitting down in a chair”

· As the knees bend, they remain directly in line with the toes and do not move past the toes

· The spine remains straight and very close to vertical throughout the entire movement (a slight “hole” is allowed in the lower back, but it is essential that the upper back does not “round”)

· The chest remains up and out (extra points if the instructor mentions keeping the gaze straight ahead or slightly above to prevent spinal rounding)

· The back of the head remains approximately parallel to a vertical line from the back of the heels – which remain flat on the floor

· The bar tracks a near vertical line throughout the movement while “pressing with the heels”

· The client exhales through the “sticking point” **

(Your flexibility may limit the performance of a perfect squat but the pointers are still valid).

While a client must consider the other attributes of a personal trainer such as personality and rapport, it is important to have some means of measuring his or her experience and credentials before making a decision to commit to a contract or long-term agreement. Hopefully this article has provided some very basic information for the lay fitness consumer to be a slightly more “informed” one.